Sports Brain Daily July 29 ,2014

Sports Brain Daily

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

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Concussion Newsstand for the week ending August 1, 2014

Concussion related articles and commentary, July 26th through August 1, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 28, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Monday, July 28, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 27, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Sunday, July 27, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 26, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Saturday, July 26, 2014

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Concussion Newsstand for the week ending July 25, 2014

Concussion related articles and commentary, July 19th through July 25, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 25, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Friday, July 25, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 24, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Thursday, July 24, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 23, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 22, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 21, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Monday, July 21, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 20, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Sunday, July 20, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 19, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Saturday, July 19, 2014

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How To Help Your Children Develop a Morning Ritual

HOW TO HELP YOUR CHILDREN DEVELOP A MORNING RITUAL

Cognitive science has begun to understand how children most effectively develop their basic thinking skills, which creates the basis of higher level development. Scientific evidence has proven that parents play a crucial role in this advancement.

As parents, we must educate ourselves, understand and support our children in each stage of their development, as their thinking and reasoning skills develop and mature.

Let’s think about our role as parents and help our children become more effective critical thinkers. In today’s fast paced world, we often receive more education on how to drive a car than on how to raise children. As a parent, one of our goals is to show our children how to become more cognitively developed. With this skill, children are able to navigate through the various pathways of education, career planning, sports, hobbies and the development of strong relationships.

Now that the summer season is here, we have the ideal opportunity to help our children build a healthy routine to start the day, well before a new school year begins. Summer is an optimal time to begin some of these rituals and incorporate them into your family’s daily schedule, because it lets us fine tune what works (and what doesn’t really work) for your family as you begin to develop new habits and routines before the pressure of the school year starts.

Here are some suggestions on how to guide your children.

Develop a morning routine to get everyone out the door on time in the morning.

For each child in your household, items on their morning agenda may include:
• Personal Prep–Waking, dressing, personal hygiene
• Food– Breakfast, lunch, snacks
• Logistics–Backpack, homework, gym uniforms, permission slips, after school activities, cash for school lunches, sales and events
• Electronics–ensuring all devices are charged
• Chores–taking care of pets, breakfast cleanup, helping younger siblings with their morning routines
• Transportation–to and from school, any after school activities
• Weather–umbrellas, boots, rain gear, sunscreen, hats
• Medication–if the school office needs a permission slip to administer medication
• Unexpected delays–poor weather, traffic accidents, last minute illnesses
• Special events–birthday parties, sleepovers, unique school events, etc.

Each family’s morning rituals are different since at each age a child requires some prep work.

Here are some examples:

1. For the preschooler, a visual chart in a central place can help them get ready each morning. Young children often need time to transition from one task to the next. Proper planning by parents is the key to success. Starting the night before is important since you have to be ready for anything with little ones and this allows everyone to be less stressed in the morning. Laying out an outfit for the next day, pre-packing lunch, homework assignments checked, backpacks at the door, confirming after school activities etc. are helpful to do before bed. As the year progresses, your child will begin to develop a sense of independence as they master their morning ritual. They will feel a sense of pride and accomplishment and will be well on their way to establishing a consistent routine that will carry them through their elementary school years.

As your child progresses through the elementary school years, his skills will continue to develop and visual reminders will often be replaced by an agenda or list. Whatever strategy works best for each child is fine, as your goal is to develop independence and the ability to master an understanding of what steps need to be taken in preparation for each day.

2. Your middle schooler is doing most of these tasks independently now because of your great preparation. A visual chart in no longer necessary, but a checklist in their backpack, in their daily agenda, or on their cell phone should be helpful. Sooner or later, some detail will be forgotten like having some cash for the lunchtime bake sale in support of the school’s soccer team or forms that needed to be signed to participate in their favorite sport. Parents can use these occurrences as an opportunity to reinforce responsibility and pre-planning. In middle school, children are all watching, learning and developing at different speeds, but your goal is to continue to build on established routines, ensuring they are aware and responsible.

3. Your high schooler is quite independent since that is a key to their success as they master their course work and as they prepare to submit college applications. They will have a busy schedule balancing academics with sports, school play, student council, maybe even a part time job. All the tools you gave your kids at an early age are now coming to fruition. They may be driving too which can even help you out with carpooling and errands. As a parent, you can see how you have prepared your children to be independent, mature, young adults. Though you will still need to give them some space, they will continue to come to you for advice and guidance and you will begin to grow your relationship to a different level. Responsible teenagers are strong models for younger members of the household, and can often contribute time and energy into helping out around the house. This can allow families to have more quality time together and even incorporate other activities like family fitness time as we discussed last month.

Unlike sports, effective parenting does not have a playbook. But one things is for sure, just like having different plays to achieve a common goal, parents can teach best practices to raise healthy independent adults. You are your child’s best teacher and developing your child’s morning rituals is just one part of your family “playbook”.

Enjoy the journey together.

By Barb Wiseberg, Director of Communications

Infographic #1 - developing-21st-century-critical-thinkers-infographic-mentoring-minds  (05-20-14)

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Sports Brain Daily July 18, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Friday, July 18, 2014

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Concussion Newsstand for the week ending July 18, 2014

Concussion related articles and commentary, July 12th through July 18, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 17, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Thursday, July 17, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 16, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 15, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

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Sports Brain Daily July 14, 2014

Sports Brain Daily

Monday, July 14, 2014

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